The No Knit List

Knitting Blog Challenge Day 22

Have you ever stricken someone off your to-knit-for list because they didn’t appreciate/take care of your last knitted gift to them?

I’ve definitely learned my lesson knitting for lots of people over the years. I have minimized my list dramatically mostly due to the stress of knitting for like ten people. It’s too much for my hands and it’s a lot of time to not be designing new patterns for my shop. The year I made socks for a bunch of my friends a lot of them seemed uncomfortable to be getting socks and a few didn’t even thank me. I’ve had a few people ask me to knit something for them “and they’ll even pay me” but balked when I told them a ballpark range of how much their item would actually cost or they simply never paid me. That’s the fastest way to the no knit list. I’ve limited my list to mostly family at this point. They understand how much labor a hand knit item takes and I know they’ll appreciate it. I actually went to buy my Christmas gift yarn haul this morning so now I’ve got my work cut out for me. I’ve got five items to whip out before the holidays.

Thoughts from a reformed yarn snob.

Knitting Blog Challenge Day 9

What fiber or yarn do you love working with?

As with most things certain yarns and fibers work better with certain projects. I’ve been really lucky to be able to work with lots and lots of different materials over the years. I’ve raised silk worms and spun from silk hankies and silk roving. I’ve been to a few sheep sheering events, one alpaca sheering, and an angora bunny sheering. I’ve washed very poopy fleeces and have been able to turn them into workable material. I’ve also been able to learn quite a bit about dying different fibers with mx, acid, and natural dyes. It’s really really hard to pick a favorite.

For a while I really enjoyed weaving and knitting lace with very very thin tencel yarn. It has a silk like quality and dyes beautifully, with the added bonus of being a plant fiber and much more cost effective.

I have also been lucky enough to have had access to a lot of 100% merino. I know a lot of people who don’t really like wool because it’s always scratchy or whatever but merino throws all of those ideas out the window.

That was all in school though. Outside of school I’ve mostly just used things I can get at chain stores and every once in a while I’ll splurge on something really nice. Most of my yarn now is mixed with acrylic and is super cheap. But honestly it gets the job done just fine. I can throw my socks in the washer because who the heck wants to hand wash a bunch of socks every week? It certainly isn’t me. I think with the things I make the most, which seem to be socks and the occasional mitten or baby sweater, functionality, durability, and ease of care out-way the yarn snob in me. Fancy yarns seem too precious some how. There’s a lot of pressure in my brain to make THE BEST PROJECT with THE PERFECT PATTERN with fancy yarn and it just kind of takes the fun out of making. I also think acrylics have come a long way from the stuff my grandmas would crochet afghans with in the 70s. I have a few blankets from them and you can literally see the strands of plastic hanging out but bonus points for still being warm and cuddly, totally washable, and not eaten by moths.

Struggles with Lace

Knitting Blog Challenge Day 8

What’s your most challenging project?

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I’ve been hanging onto a cone of this beautiful golden yellow mercerized cotton. One of my professors during school was clearing out the yarn closet and was going to toss it and I just had to rescue it. I think it works great with this lace pattern. It’s strong enough to work the three into nine stitches, it’s crisp while still having a nice drape and very shiny for a cotton yarn.

The first go around I tried making a racer back style tank from the top down. I got to the armpits and I could already tell that it wasn’t going to fit right. The next time I tried just a basic camisole and that didn’t want to work either. I’ve frogged it a bunch of times and have kind of given up on knitting it for the time being. But I haven’t given up the idea.

Little Sweaters

Knitting Blog Challenge Day 5

How long did it take from the time your learned how to knit, to finish your first project?

Quick one today, since it seems like a lot of these questions over lap a little. My first finished project according to my Ravelry history is the Baby Poonam by Norah Gaughan which took me about two months to finish. Finish date is the end of April and I figure I started learning in January so a solid four months from learning to finish. I’d say that’s pretty good time considering the sweater in question in fairly technical- cables, seaming, button holes, set in sleeves. I still think the sweater is adorable and might think about making it again with a few years of knitting under my belt. If I also remember correctly there’s a matching adult version I could make for myself whenever I get around to finishing what’s already on my needles.

For more on this sweater check out my previous post!

 

30 Day Knitting Blog Challenge

To get into the habit of writing more frequently I dug up a blogging challenge I’ve seen floating around on Tumblr. I always thought about doing one but never bothered to go through with it. But we’re going to try this out and see how it goes, this is primarily a knitting blog after all. I’ll post the full list at the bottom of this post incase anyone else wants to follow along.

Day 1: What was your first finished project?

I remember the last crochet project I finished. It was a baby blanket for my cousin. I remember thinking as I was frantically trying to finish the blanket that I wish I knew how to knit and that I should teach myself right now. My mother wisely reminded me to finish one project before taking on an entirely new craft. I finished the project and immediately started watching youtube videos of people knitting.

I’m not entirely sure what my first finished project was but according to Ravelry my first finished project was the Lamar Scarf by Gale Zucker. My project page says I finished it in May 2012 and it took several months to complete. There is of course no picture of this project but I used the chunkiest grossest fake wool. I believe it was barely long enough to be functional but I was super impressed with myself because it was cabled and reversible. At one point I had intended on undoing the cast off and making it longer but I just never got around to it. The sad creature is probably sitting in my parent’s basement waiting to be thrown out.

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